Intermittent Fasting – Whaaat?

In a nutshell, intermittent fasting is just that: fasting intermittently. But WHAT is it exactly and are there any benefits (and will it help me lose weight)?

By definition, it’s limiting calorie intake during certain hours/day or days/week. It’s more of an eating pattern than a diet (think along the lines of carb cycling). It limits when to eat, and not so much what to eat. And that’s part of it’s appeal to people who don’t want to count calories or use their food log to track everything. That’s not to say that it can’t be used as part of particular way of eating (Keto for example).

Supporters of intermittent fasting say that it’s a more natural way to eat because humans evolved without refrigerators, drive-throughs, or 24-hour convenience stores. We now have access to food (including junk food) all day long, so eating several meals per day plus snacks may be less natural than fasting from time to time. In addition, intermittent fasting has also been linked to improvement in the brain’s neurological functioning.

In this TEDx talk, Mark Mattson, talks about how and why fasting is good for the brain. He’s the current Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging. He is also a professor of Neuroscience at The Johns Hopkins University. Mattson is one of the foremost researchers in the area of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

There are lots of variations on this theme.  A few include:

  • 16/8 which is 16 hours of fasting, and eating only within the other 8 hours (often 1:00 pm. – 9:00 p.m.);
  • 5:2 days of fasting, where you eat regularly for five days of the week, then take in just 500-600 calories/day for the other two (non-consecutive) days.

So, we know it’s good for the brain….but is intermittent fasting also effective for weight loss? It can help to lose weight because it can help you to eat fewer calories, and burn more calories too. Lots of people say they have success with it…but what do the studies say?

  1. According to one review study, intermittent fasting helped people to lose 3-8% of their weight over 3-24 weeks.  In this study, people also lost 4-7% of their waist circumference (i.e., belly fat).
  2. Another study of 100 people with obesity showed that after a year, the people who fasted on alternate days lost more weight than people who didn’t change their eating pattern. But, (and here’s what is interesting) they didn’t lose any more weight than those on a calorie restricted diet. Out of the people who were to follow the intermittent fasting protocol, 38% of them dropped out.

One of the reasons people drop out of the intermittent fasting eating pattern is that it’s hard to stick with the fasting part. They eat more than the allowed level of calories when they’re supposed to be fasting. And when they finish fasting, they may overindulge due to the reaction of the appetite hormones and hunger drive while fasting. So having strong social support will be key to those intermittent periods of fasting.

Before you consider intermittent fasting, you should know it’s not for everyone. People who are underweight, or have eating disorders shouldn’t fast. Neither should women who are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

In addition, certain medical conditions can be worsened with longer periods of fasting and people taking certain medications can be prone to side effects with intermittent fasting as well. As with any eating program, checking in with you healthcare provider before getting started is also a good idea.

What about you – Have you or someone you know tried intermittent fasting? What were the results? Let me know in the comments below.

Recipe: Almond Butter Energy Bites*

granola balls

Makes about 16 energy bites

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup oats
  • ½ cup almond butter
  • 2/3 cup shredded coconut (unsweetened)
  • ½ cup chocolate chips (semi-sweet and dairy-free if possible)
  • ½ cup flax seeds, ground
  • 2 tbsp maca powder
  • 1/4 cup raw honey

*These are NOT kid friendly (Unless you want them with an overabundance of energy after consuming the maca…..) To make them for your kids (which I do ALL THE TIME), just remove the maca powder. Perfect granola balls that the kids love.

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and stir.
  2. Using a tablespoon to measure, roll into about 14-16 energy bites.
  3. Serve & enjoy!

Tip: You can roll the bites to coat them in cocoa powder for a bit of extra flavour and to prevent them from being too sticky.


The Mediterranean Diet 101

Maybe you’ve heard of it and thought hmmmm, a ‘diet’ that includes wine?! Sign me up! But then never looked into it anymore. There are SO MANY health benefits that result when you subscribe to following a Mediterranean way of eating.

To begin, it’s one of the most studied lifestyles out there. It’s based on the traditional foods that people who lived around the Mediterranean Sea ate about 50 – 70 years ago. Back then, in the mid 20th century, researchers noted that people in Spain, Greece, and Italy lived longer and healthier than North Americans. And they had lower levels of heart disease, the #1 killer.

The research keeps coming in on determining what is so healthy in this part of the world and what we’re seeing is pretty impressive.

Eating a Mediterranean based diet is linked with:

  • Less risk of being overweight and obesity
  • Better blood sugar control (for diabetes and metabolic syndrome)
  • Lower risk of heart disease and stroke (and blood markers like cholesterol and triglycerides)
  • Reduced risk of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases
  • Fewer cancers (breast & colorectal)
  • Less premature death

Overall, it’s simply really good for you.

BREAKING NEWS: Recent research even links the Mediterranean diet to better gut microbes! This makes sense when you feed your gut, friendly, microbe-loving foods including fibre, fruit, and vegetables.

Here’s another bonus: Most people that I work with want to make changes in how they look and feel but struggle because they focus on restrictive diets that make it difficult to maintain long-term. I’ve found that many women and families who start eating a Mediterranean diet can stick with it long-term. How’s that for a healthy whole-foods health-promoting not-so-restrictive diet?

So, what are you actually eating on a Mediterranean diet…and what’s the bit about drinking wine?

It’s quite simple to follow since the Mediterranean diet is chock full of healthy whole foods. #myfavourite

Foods like:

  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Legumes
  • Whole grains
  • Fish and seafood
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Herbs and spices

These foods are full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, healthy fats, and fibre. And they’re often eaten in social settings where the food (and the company) is enjoyed so people don’t ever have to feel like they are missing out or that they have to pack food to bring along. The other BONUS to the Mediterranean diet is that it discourages being too sedentary, eating alone, and being overly stressed…all habits that result in weight-gain and sickness.

The go-to beverage for the Mediterranean diet is water. Coffee and tea are also regularly consumed (but without the addition of lots of sugar or milk).

And YES, red wine (about 1 glass per day) is very commonly enjoyed. #canIgetanAMEN

Some foods and drinks that are eaten in moderation include:

  • Poultry
  • Eggs
  • Cheese and yogurt

Red meat, unfermented dairy (e.g., milk), and salt are rarely consumed, if at all.

Although this is not a restrictive way of eating, there are foods that are not consumed when eating Mediterranean. Not surprisingly, this includes many highly processed and unhealthy foods like:

  • Processed meats
  • Sauces and gravies
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages or fruit juices
  • Refined grains and oils (including hydrogenated oils)
  • Too much salt
  • Added sugars
  • Desserts

Overall, the Mediterranean diet is a very healthy way of eating. It is a whole-foods diet based on fish, olive oil, and herbs and spices and focussed on plant foods (fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains). It is high in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, healthy fats, and fibre; all of which are health-boosting from your head to your heart… and the rest of your body.

Health isn’t just about what you put in your body…it encompasses body, mind and spirit. I love that the Mediterranean lifestyle incorporates regular exercise, eating with people whom you care about, and overall enjoyment of life. ALL the keys to health and happiness!

Do you think you could add or ditch certain foods to get closer to the Mediterranean diet? Do you have a favourite recipe that embodies this way of eating? I’d love to know! Add it to the comments below.

One Pan Mediterranean Cod

mediterraneancod5

photo credit: kit coastal

Ingredients:

  • 4 cod fillets
  • 1 cup Basil Leaves
  • 1/4 Lemon (juiced)
  • 1/2Garlic (clove)
  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt
  • 2 tbsps Hemp Seeds
  • 2 tbsps Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 2 handfuls asparagus, ends removed
  • 1/4 cup Pitted Kalamata Olives
  • Tomato (large, quartered)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450F and line a baking sheet with parchment.
  2. Make pesto by combining basil, lemon juice, garlic, sea salt, hemp seeds and olive oil together in a small food processor. Pulse until smooth.
  3. Lay cod on baking sheet and arrange the asparagus, olives and tomatoes on the baking dish around the fillets. Top each piece of cod with a generous spoonful of pesto.
  4. Bake for 10-15 minutes or until fish is cooked through. Divide onto plates and enjoy!

A Powerful Anti-Inflammatory You Can Eat?

Let’s talk turmeric.

Turmeric is a rhizome that grows under the ground like ginger. It has a rich, bright, orange colour and is used in many foods. Originally used in Southeast Asia, it’s a vital component for traditional curries. You can find dried, powdered turmeric in the spice aisle of just about any grocery store and sometimes they carry the fresh rhizome too (it looks like ginger root, but thinner and smaller).

Turmeric contains an amazing anti-inflammatory, antioxidant compound called “curcumin” which I’m sure you’ve heard of. The amount of this bioactive compound is around 3-7% by weight of turmeric. Curcumin has been studied like crazy for its health benefits and many of these studies test curcumin at up to 100x more than that of a traditional diet that includes turmeric.

So, what makes curcumin so powerful?

Firstly, it’s an anti-inflammatory compound and fights inflammation at the molecular level. There are dozens of clinical studies using curcumin extract (which is way more concentrated than ground turmeric) and many of them even show it can work as well as certain anti-inflammatory medications (but without the side effects).

Secondly, curcumin is an antioxidant compound meaning it can neutralize free radicals before they wreak havoc on our biomolecules. Curcumin also boosts our natural antioxidant enzymes.

These two functions of reducing inflammation and oxidation have amazing health benefits. We know that chronic inflammation plays a major role in so many conditions, including heart disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, dementia, mood disorders, and arthritis pain, therefore, reducing the amount of inflammation in our bodies also reduces the liklihood of developing disease.

Curcumin has other amazing functions too:

  • Boosts our levels of “Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor” (like a natural growth hormone for your brain) which is great for brain health.
  • Improves “endothelial” function (the inner lining of our blood vessels) which is important for heart health.
  • Reduces growth of cancer cells by reducing angiogenesis (growth of new blood vessels in tumors), metastasis ( the spread of cancer), and even contributes to the death of cancer cells. Amazing right?

This all sounds amazing and I’m sure you’re ready to start incorporating curcumin in your diet but you need to consider these few things.

To start, curcumin is not easily absorbed by your gut. It’s fat soluble – so, as with all fat-soluble nutrients (like vitamins A, D, E, and K), you can increase absorption by eating it with a fat-containing meal.

The second trick to get the most out of your turmeric is eating it with pepper.  Interestingly, a compound in black pepper (piperine) enhances absorption of curcumin, by a whopping 2,000%!

If you want all the health benefits of curcumin, you need to get a larger dose than just eating some turmeric – and this is where supplements come in. Obviously, you want to take caution if you:

  • Are pregnant
  • Are taking anti-platelet medications or blood thinners
  • Have gallstones or a bile duct obstruction
  • Have stomach ulcers or excess stomach acid

(Always read the label before taking a new supplement.)

I want to know: What’s your favourite turmeric recipe? Try my version of “golden milk,” (an anti-inflammatory drink) and let me know what you think in the comments below.

Recipe (turmeric): Golden Milk

golden-milk-3

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup canned coconut milk
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 ½ tsp turmeric, ground
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon, ground
  • ½ tsp honey

Directions:

  1. Add all ingredients to a small saucepan. Whisk to combine.
  2. Warm over medium heat, whisking frequently. Heat until hot, but not boiling.
  3. Serve & enjoy!

Tip: You can substitute 2 cups of almond milk instead of the 1 cup coconut milk and 1 cup water.


Done With Moo Milk? 6 Alternatives To Help You Go Dairy-Free!

If you’re reading this, you likely already are or may be considering going dairy-free. You may have an intolerance, have been told to eliminate dairy, or just want to have less of it.

Did you know that dairy is inflammatory and also mucous causing? If your kids (or you) are suffering from a cold and the congestion that comes with it, you should consider removing dairy from your diet and I bet you’ll see a decrease in your mucous, congestion or both!

Whatever your reason for wanting to eliminate it, dairy is not an essential nutrient, and there are lots of things you can have instead. Yes, you read that right. Dairy is NOT an essential nutrient. Calcium is…but there are many other foods you can eat that contain more calcium per ounce than dairy does. For a short list of calcium rich foods, click here.

The good news is that dairy-free products are becoming more and more popular. You can easily find them in the grocery store, but make sure you read your labels! Some contain way too much sugar, or other ingredients you may not be able to pronounce….and chances are, you wouldn’t want to eat or drink them anyway.

I’ve put together some simple recipes to make delicious dairy-free foods right in your kitchen. So, go ahead and try these dairy substitutes!

  1. Delicious dairy-free milk

Dairy-free milk is so easy to make and flavour yourself. You can make milk out of just about any nut or seed. You can even make alternative milk out of grains like rice, oats, or quinoa.

It just takes a high-powered blender, some water, and cheesecloth to filter out any remaining bits. For flavouring, you can add a pinch of cinnamon, cardamom, or vanilla extract. You can also sweeten your milk with soaked dates, maple syrup, or honey.

My absolute favourite to make is cashew milk. It’s super simple and requires no straining #causeaintnobodygottimeforthat. To make this super-simple dairy-free milk, here’s my go-to recipe.

If you’ve got time to spare or want to explore making different types of nut milk, try this: Soak ½ cup of almonds, coconut, or even hemp seeds for a few hours. Soaking IS optional, but it makes the blending process easier and the final milk creamier…so, soak the nuts. Then drain the soaking water, rinse, and add to a blender with 2 cups of fresh water. Blend on high until smooth (about 1-2 minutes). Add your flavourings, if desired. Then strain through a nut milk bag, fine mesh strainer, or a few layers of cheesecloth.

If you want to make a dairy-free cream, just blend your nuts, seeds and/or grains with 1 cup of water instead of 2 for a thicker, creamier, dairy-free milk. #easypeasy

2. Delicious dairy-free yogurt

Technically, with the right yogurt starter probiotic culture, you can make yogurt out of any dairy-free milk. The most common one to ferment into yogurt is coconut milk. But you can use almond milk or other nut or seed milk. Coconut milk is also paleo, keto, AIP and lowFODMAP friendly. #bonus

The trick here is with the fermentation. I like to use Cultures for Health yogurt starter. Follow the instructions on the label of the yogurt starter culture, and enjoy delicious dairy-free yogurt in a few days.

And if you have an Instant Pot….try this coconut yogurt recipe.

3. Delicious dairy-free butter alternatives

I’ll be honest, I encourage people to eat butter. It’s great for cooking, baking and it’s a medium chain triglyceride (MCT). It’s good for you…and unless you have a milk allergy, butter can be consumed by people who are going dairy free because butter is the fat of cream. The protein and carbohydrates are no longer present. If you have a milk allergy however, butter is off the table because it could contain trace amounts of milk/cream.

My alternative for butter is coconut oil. It’s a great substitute for butter and also very versatile. You can fry with it, or even bake with it (use the extra virgin type so that the coconut flavour does not overpower the other flavours. My FAVE use of coconut oil is to cook popcorn with it on the stove…SO FREAKIN DELISH!

4. Delicious dairy-free parmesan

If you haven’t tried nutritional yeast, you will be pleasantly surprised at how much it tastes like grated parmesan. Plus, it contains some B vitamins as well. It’s a salty, cheesy, flaky powder that you can use wherever you want to add a pop of savoury flavour to any dish.

TIP: After you’ve popped your popcorn, sprinkle it with a bit of nutritional yeast for a salty, cheesy flavour.

5. Delicious dairy-free puddings

Did you know you can make a delicious and thick pudding without dairy? That’s right; the plant kingdom has some natural thickeners that are full of fibre.

You can make a chocolate pudding with avocado. Take one whole avocado and blend it up with ¼ cup cocoa powder, ¼ cup dairy-free milk, 1 tsp vanilla extract, and honey or maple syrup to taste. Then add dairy-free milk to thin if desired.

For chocolate chia pudding, use cup chia seeds and place in food processor with 1.5 cups dairy-free milk. Wait for 5-10 minutes until the seeds soak up the liquid. Then add ¼ cup cocoa powder, tsp vanilla extract, and honey or maple syrup to taste. Blend into a smooth pudding.

6. Delicious dairy-free ice cream

Who doesn’t love ice cream? Exactly! Even if you are going dairy free, you can still enjoy this sweet treat. N’ice cream is another delicious dessert made with frozen bananas. I’ve included the recipe for this below.

Which recipe are you going to try?  Do you have a great one to share as well? Let me know in the comments below.

Recipe (dairy-free): Chocolate Almond N’ice Cream

Chocolate-Coconut-Ice-Cream

Photo credit: A Food Centric Life

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 2 bananas, chopped and frozen
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder, unsweetened
  • 2 tbsp almond butter, unsweetened

 

Directions:

  1. Add chopped frozen bananas to a food processor. Pulse or lightly blend until almost smooth.
  2. Add cocoa powder and nut butter. Pulse or lightly blend until mixed.
  3. Serve immediately & enjoy!

Tip: Try different nut and/or seed butter. Or instead of cocoa powder and/or seed butter, use just the bananas with a ½ cup of frozen berries. The recipe combinations are endless.


Need A Mood Boost? Eat This!

No question that what you eat can affect how you feel, right? Both positively and negatively. (And the same goes for your kids. )

Mental health and brain health are incredibly complex. As are the foods we eat, and the ways our bodies interact with those foods. While, we don’t know the exact mechanisms of how food and nutrition help, we know a few ways that food impacts our moods.

First, we know that what we eat becomes the raw materials for our neurotransmitters. “Neurotransmitters” are biochemical messengers that allow our nerve cells to communicate. They are important not just for thinking and memory, but also for mental health. Second, we know what we eat affects our blood sugar. And having unstable blood sugar levels can contribute to mood swings…bad ones. Where do you think the term #hangry comes from?

So, let’s talk about mood-boosting and mood-busting foods….which ones to include and which ones to avoid. Especially as we move into the winter months, with less hours of sunlight we need to take external steps to support and improve our mood.

Top Mood Boosting Foods and Supplements

  1. Did you know that some nutrient deficiencies can look like mental health problems? Yup. The food we eat (or don’t eat) can affect us so profoundly that it mimics a mental health imbalance…this includes deficiencies in B-vitamins, vitamin D, and the mineral selenium. Clearly, getting enough vitamins, minerals, (and other things like antioxidants) are key. These nutrients not only reduce inflammation but also fuel the biochemical reactions in our bodies. So make sure you’re eating a variety of nutrient-dense whole foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. In fact, studies show that people who eat the most fruits and vegetables are the happiest. #yesplease
  2. Pay special attention to vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin), as it’s not naturally occurring in too many foods.
  3. Selenium is an essential mineral found in Brazil nuts, walnuts, cod, and poultry. Try to add some of those to your weekly diet.
  4. Fourth. Make sure you get enough protein. Protein is your body’s main supply of amino acids. Amino acids are very important for mood issues because they are the building blocks of neurotransmitters. I recommend eating protein with every meal and don’t forget that protein also helps to regulate blood sugar,
  5. Fifth. Complex carbohydrates like sweet potato and quinoa are great too. They allow better absorption of key amino acids like tryptophan (and remember that Turkey time is just around the corner). Tryptophan is used by your body to make serotonin (your “happy hormone”) and melatonin (your “sleepy” hormone). So, if you want to relax, try these in the evening.
  6. Sixth. Fish and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, and algae) are also mood-boosting. Omega-3s are definitely “brain food” and may help to ease some symptoms.

FUN FACT: One study showed that giving one multi-vitamin and one omega-3  fish oil tablet per day to prison inmates reduced the incidence of violent behavior by 50%!

Not that I’m comparing my kids to prison inmates buuuuuuut, ALL my kids get fish oil in the morning to help set them up for the day AND in the evening before bed to help calm them and prepare them for sleep.

Last but not least, make sure you’re hydrated. Mild dehydration can cause mood issues as well!

Top Mood-busting foods

This shouldn’t be a surprise to you – processed foods are mood-busters! One study suggests that eating a lot of processed foods devoid of nutrients can increase your chances of becoming depressed by as much as 60 percent! This is on top of the research that shows nutrient deficiencies can look like mental health imbalances. How much feedback do you need to jump off this bandwagon? Processed foods are problematic for so many reasons.

I know you’re probably thinking….“But it makes me feel good!” Yes, some of these mood busters can make you feel better…but only temporarily. Most big food companies hire scientists to study how to maximize the “pleasure” centers with the perfect amount of sugar, salt, and fat. Not to mention the color, texture, and taste; they can light up our taste buds and make us feel good… for now. They call it the “bliss point” and their goal is light up this centre of your brain on a regular basis.

But do you know what also makes you feel good? Weight training,  running, walking..or just moving! Lots of things can help boost your mood and make you feel good….AND have the added benefit of improving your health.

A few other things to avoid are:

  • Alcohol (nervous system depressant)
  • Caffeine (may worsen anxious feelings and ability to sleep)
  • Sugar (messes with your blood sugar and can worsen inflammation).

Bad moods can lead to bad eating habits; and, bad eating habits can lead to bad moods. If you need a mood boost, stick to minimally processed nutrient-dense whole foods. Things like fresh fruit and vegetables (including leafy greens), nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, poultry, and meat. Avoid common mood-busting foods like alcohol, caffeine, and sugar.

And remember, sometimes “feel good” junk foods, only make you feel good temporarily.

Recipe (mood boosting): Fruit Salad

fruit salad

Serves 6-8

Ingredients:

  • 1-2 cups watermelon, cubed
  • 1-2 cups cantaloupe, cubed
  • 1-2 cups blueberries, fresh
  • 1-2 cups blackberries, fresh
  • 1-2 cups green grapes
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds (optional)
  • 2 tbsp walnuts (optional)

Directions:

  1. Place all fruit in a large bowl and gently toss.
  2. Serve & enjoy!

 


The Queen Drinks It…It Must Be Good!

Tea is said to be the most popular beverage in the world. It’s been consumed for thousands of years by millions, perhaps billions, of people.

Tea has also been shown to have many health benefits. And some of these benefits are thought to be related to tea’s antioxidant properties. These properties are from its flavonoids known as “catechins.” Flavonoids are anti-inflammatory and have a range of health benefits that I’ll share with you later.

What’s the difference between black tea and green tea (or does one even exist)?

First of all, they both come from the camellia sinensis shrub that’s native to China and India. Green tea contains slightly more health-promoting flavonoids than black tea. The difference lies in how each type of tea is processed.

If the leaves are steamed or heated, this keeps them green. The heat stops oxidation from turning them black. Then they’re dried to preserve the colour and flavonoids. Hence you have green tea.

If the leaves are not heated, and are crushed and rolled, then they continue to oxidize until they’re dry. This oxidation uses up some of the flavonoids’ antioxidant power, so black teas have slightly less ability to combat free radicals than green tea does.

Did you know? Adding milk to your tea reduces the antioxidant ability….

Both green and black teas contain about half of the caffeine in coffee. That translates to about 20-45 mg per 8 oz cup….so if you are trying to cut back on your caffeine consumption, try drinking tea!

What are some the specific health benefits of drinking tea?

Heart health – For one thing, both green and black tea drinkers seem to have high levels of antioxidants in their blood compared with non-tea drinkers. Green and black tea drinkers also have lower risks of heart attacks and stroke. Drinking green tea, in particular, is associated with reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL oxidation, all of which are risk factors for heart conditions.

Overall, drinkers of green and black tea seem to have a lower risk of heart problems. Green tea has also been shown to reduce risk factors (i.e., blood lipid levels) a bit more than black tea.

Cancers – Antioxidants also reduce the risk of many cancers. Studies show that both green and black teas can reduce the risk of prostate cancer (the most common cancer in men). Also, green tea drinkers have a lowered risk of breast and colorectal cancers. Black tea is being researched for its potential to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer.

Overall, antioxidant flavonoids in tea seem to help reduce the risk of some different cancers. Green tea may have a slight edge over black tea, but both seem to be associated with lower cancer risk.

Diabetes – Both green and black teas can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. They also reduce diabetes risk factors, like elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance. For example, some studies have shown that both green and black teas can help reduce blood sugar levels. Other studies have shown that green tea can also improve insulin sensitivity.

Once again, green tea seems to have a slight edge over black tea, but both are blood sugar friendly (just don’t overdo the added sugar).

So, what’s the verdict on tea? 

Green tea retains more of the beneficial antioxidants than black tea does; but both are associated with better health than non-tea drinkers. Overall, both green and black teas are healthy drinks, and tea drinkers, in general, seem to have fewer health conditions than non-tea drinkers. Green tea seems to have a slight edge over black tea when it comes to measurable risk factors of some common diseases.

I’d love to know: Are you a tea drinker? Which tea is your favourite? How do you like to enjoy it? Let me know in the comments below.

Recipe (Green tea): Matcha Energy Bites

matcha enrgy bites

Serves 6 (makes 12-18 bites)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup shredded coconut, unsweetened
  • 4 tbsp almond flour
  • 1 tbsp matcha green tea
  • 2 tbsp honey or maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil

Directions:

  1. Add all ingredients into food processor and pulse until blended.
  2. Shape into 1-1.5″ balls.
  3. Serve & enjoy….and try not to eat them all!

Tip: If you use sweetened coconut, then you can eliminate the honey/maple syrup.